Ambulatory and central haemodynamics during progressive ascent to high-altitude and associated hypoxia

Posted at — Mario Hernández Cueto — noviembre 27th, 2014 — 8:41 under comentario

Ambulatory and central haemodynamics during progressive ascent to high-altitude and associated hypoxia

Por: M G Schultz, R E D Climie y J E Sharman.   1-comentado1

High-altitude hypoxia causes major cardiovascular changes, which may result in raised resting brachial blood pressure (BP). However, the effect of high-altitude hypoxia on more sensitive measures of BP control (such as 24?h ambulatory BP and resting central BP) is largely unknown. This study aimed to assess this and compare high-altitude responses to resting brachial BP, as well as determine the haemodynamic correlates of acute mountain sickness (AMS) during a progressive trekking ascent to high-altitude. Measures of oxygen saturation (pulse oximetry), 24?h ambulatory BP, resting brachial and central BP (Pulsecor) were recorded in 10 adults (aged 27±4, 30% male) during a 9-day trek to Mount Everest base camp, Nepal. Data were recorded at sea level (stage 1; <450?m above sea level (ASL)) and at progressive ascension to 3440?m ASL (stage 2), 4350?m ASL (stage 3) and 5164?m ASL .

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