Tag Archive 'Queloides'

Viernes 16 / marzo / 2012

Molecular dissection of abnormal wound healing processes resulting in keloid disease.

Filed under: Temas de meses anteriores — Dr. Pável Reyes Rodríguez — marzo 16th, 2012 — 2:10 PM

Molecular dissection of abnormal wound healing processes resulting in keloid disease
Shih B, Garside E, McGrouther DA, Bayat A.
Wound Repair Regen. 2010 Mar-Apr;18(2):139-53.

cover3Keloids are locally aggressive scars that typically invade into healthy surrounding skin and cause both physical and psychosocial distress to the patient. These pathological scars occur following minimal skin trauma after a variety of causes including burns and trauma. Although the pathogenesis of keloid disease is not well understood, it is considered to be the end product of an abnormal healing process. The aim of this review was to investigate the molecular and cellular pathobiology of keloid disease in relation to the normal wound healing process. This review presents a detailed account of individual phases of the healing process and how they may potentially be implicated in aberrant raised scar formation, which may help in clarifying the mechanisms involved in keloid disease pathogenesis.

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Viernes 16 / marzo / 2012

Treatment of keloids and hypertrophic scars: a meta-analysis and review of the literature.

Filed under: Temas de meses anteriores — Dr. Pável Reyes Rodríguez — marzo 16th, 2012 — 1:53 PM

Treatment of keloids and hypertrophic scars: a meta-analysis and review of the literature
Leventhal D, Furr M, Reiter D.
Arch Facial Plast Surg. 2006 Nov-Dec;8(6):362-8.

archives-facial-of-plastic-surgeryManagement of hypertrophic scars and keloids has advanced from crude, invasive methods such as gross excision and radiation to intralesional or topical agents that act on a cellular level. There is no universally accepted treatment regimen and no evidence-based literature to guide management. Our objectives are to present a list of available treatment regimens, their proposed mechanisms of action, and supporting evidence and to perform a meta-analysis of clinical trials to identify treatments with a better-than-even likelihood of improvement. We conducted a PubMed search through October 2005, identifying clinical studies of various treatments for hypertrophic scars and keloids. We graded the quality of each study, delineated the results into favorable vs nonfavorable, and calculated the statistical significance of the findings. The meta-analysis of 70 treatment series for various clinical measures showed a 70% chance of improvement with treatment; however, the mean amount of improvement to be expected was around 60%. There was no statistically significant difference between treatments. Most treatments for keloidal and hypertrophic scarring offer minimal likelihood of improvement. The magnitude of likely permanent improvement in any sign or symptom may be clinically meaningful but far short of cure. Novel therapies deserve further investigation but remain without proven benefit to date.

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Viernes 16 / marzo / 2012

Hypertrophic scarring and keloids: pathomechanisms and current and emerging treatment strategies.

Filed under: Temas de meses anteriores — Dr. Pável Reyes Rodríguez — marzo 16th, 2012 — 1:47 PM

Hypertrophic scarring and keloids: pathomechanisms and current and emerging treatment strategies
Gauglitz GG, Korting HC, Pavicic T, Ruzicka T, Jeschke MG.
Mol Med. 2011 Jan-Feb;17(1-2):113-25.

Excessive scars form as a result of aberrations of physiologic wound healing and may arise following any insult to the deep dermis. By causing pain, pruritus and contractures, excessive scarring significantly affects the patient’s quality of life, both physically and psychologically. Multiple studies on hypertrophic scar and keloid formation have been conducted for decades and have led to a plethora of therapeutic strategies to prevent or attenuate excessive scar formation. However, most therapeutic approaches remain clinically unsatisfactory, most likely owing to poor understanding of the complex mechanisms underlying the processes of scarring and wound contraction. In this review we summarize the current understanding of the pathophysiology underlying keloid and hypertrophic scar formation and discuss established treatments and novel therapeutic strategies.

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